EDUCATIONAL CURRICULUM AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP CULTURE AMONG THE YOUTH: A CASE STUDY OF UNIVERSITY OF ZULULAND

  • Thobile Radebe University of Zululand
  • Makhosazana Vezi-Magigaba University of Zululand

Abstract

Youth entrepreneurship is broadly considered as an important factor of economic growth, job creation and poverty alleviation. Lack of education and training pose major challenges for youth participation in entrepreneurship. This study examines the extent to which the educational curriculum fosters an entrepreneurship culture among the youth, with specific reference to the University of Zululand. The mixed method study surveyed three hundred and seventy-four (374) students and interviewed eleven (11) heads of departments from different faculties at the University of Zululand. The key findings indicated that the university educational curriculum does not equip the students with entrepreneurial skills and mindsets that enable them to start their own businesses. More significantly, the entrepreneurship is only taught in business management departments where the focus is biased towards theory rather than the practical aspects of business ventures. The study concluded that the educational curriculum was too theoretical and that universities has not yet recognized the significance of teaching entrepreneurship across all faculties. The main recommendations are the need for a policy shift towards teaching entrepreneurship in all universities faculties and placing emphasis on the practical aspects of venture creation in entrepreneurship studies, as well as developing incubation centres for grooming entrepreneurs at higher learning institutions.

Author Biographies

Thobile Radebe, University of Zululand

Department of Business Management

Makhosazana Vezi-Magigaba, University of Zululand

Department of Business Management

Published
2020-09-30